ANTONI GAUDÍ

Reus, 25 June 1852 – Barcelona, 10 June 1926

Ahead of his time, unique. A man of faith, observer of nature and genius architect, Antoni Gaudí has become a universal figure in modern architecture. His contribution to this discipline broke all the established rules. With never-before-seen building and structural systems, he created his own unique, unprecedented methodology and a style suffused with symbolism with the utmost care in every detail, showing his love of artisan trades. 
 

Reus, 25 June 1852 – Barcelona, 10 June 1926

Ahead of his time, unique. A man of faith, observer of nature and genius architect, Antoni Gaudí has become a universal figure in modern architecture.

ANTONI GAUDÍ

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The architect

The architect

The architect

The architect

  • 1862 - 1867

    Antoni Gaudí was born on 25 June 1852 in Reus, then the second-largest city in Catalonia. He went to primary school at Escoles Pies, where he excelled in geometry and arithmetic and received a traditional religious education in the humanities. The son of a potsmith, he began learning the trade in his father's workshop in 1860. He spent his childhood in Reus and the neighbouring town of Riudoms, at his father's family farmhouse, where he observed close up what would become a guiding reference throughout his life: nature.

    Antoni Gaudí was born on 25 June 1852 in Reus, then the second-largest city in Catalonia. He went to primary school at Escoles Pies, where he excelled in geometry and arithmetic and received a traditional religious education in the humanities.

    1862 - 1867
  • 1868 - 1913

    In 1868, he moved to Barcelona and prepared to go to the School of Architecture, where he started in 1873. While he was studying, he also worked as an assistant at architecture studios and at carpentry, glaziery and locksmithing workshops, where he learned these trades.

    In 1878, with his degree in architecture in hand, he received his first official commission. As his professional reputation grew, he took on larger projects commissioned by the bourgeoisie, including Casa Calvet, Casa Batlló and Casa Milà, among others. In 1883, he took over the project for the Sagrada Família, while still working on other buildings.

    In 1868, he moved to Barcelona and started classes at the School of Architecture in 1873. In 1878, with his degree in architecture in hand, he received his first big commission from the bourgeoisie. In 1883, he took over the project for the Sagrada Família, while still working on other buildings.

    1868 - 1913
  • 1914 - 1926

    In 1914, he decided to not take on any other projects so he could concentrate exclusively on the Sagrada Família. Throughout his career, his main sources of inspiration were light and nature, which he said was his true master. At the same time, the Bible and the liturgy were also a great source of inspiration to the architect, which can be seen clearly in the Temple of the Sagrada Família.

    Gaudí spent twelve years working solely on the Sagrada Família, until the day he died on 10 June 1926 after being run over by a tram. His funeral procession, which passed through most of Barcelona and ended up at the Sagrada Família, was a grand event with people turning out to say their goodbyes to the man who was, and still is, the greatest architect Barcelona has ever seen. Gaudí is buried in the chapel of Our Lady of Carmel, in the Temple crypt.

    In 1914, he decided to not take on any other projects so he could concentrate exclusively on the Sagrada Família. Throughout his career, his main sources of inspiration were light and nature. At the same time, the Bible and the liturgy were also a great source of inspiration to the architect, which can be seen clearly in the Temple of the Sagrada Família.

    Gaudí spent twelve years working solely on the Sagrada Família, until the day he died on 10 June 1926 after being run over by a tram. Gaudí is buried in the chapel of Our Lady of Carmel, in the Temple crypt.

    1914 - 1926

The method

Gaudí's method was based on trial and error, so models were very important to him, even taking precedence over floor plans. He would normally set up his workshop on the site and experiment with scale models, testing the shapes and structures that would later be used in his constructions. And he did the same at the Sagrada Família, where the architects who have carried on the works continue to use this method, now with help from new technology.

Gaudí's method was based on trial and error, so models were very important to him. He used scale models to experiment with shapes and structures. And he did the same at the Sagrada Família, where the architects who have carried on the works continue to use this method, now with help from new technology.

The method

The work

Antoni Gaudí, one of the most universal figures of Catalan culture and international architecture, devoted more than 40 years to the Temple of the Sagrada Família.

Once he got his degree in architecture in 1878, Gaudí began working on smaller projects. However, he soon became one of the most sought-after architects and began taking on larger commissions. Apart from the Sagrada Família, the most important project of his life, Antoni Gaudí left behind many other one-of-a-kind works in Barcelona, including Park Güell, Casa Vicens, Casa Batlló, Casa Milà, Casa Calvet, Torre Bellesguard and Col·legi de les Teresianes, in addition to the pavilions at the Güell estate. Furthermore, Gaudí was also the architect for several projects in Catalonia such as the warehouse at the Mataró Workers Cooperative (Mataró) and the crypt at Colònia Güell (Santa Coloma de Cervelló); and in Spain, such as El Capricho (Comillas, Cantabria), the Episcopal Palace of Astorga and Casa Botines (Castile and León).

His originality, creativity and ability to innovate have made Gaudí a universal figure in architecture. In fact, his work is known worldwide and his legacy, despite the passing of time, is more alive than ever.

Gaudí took over the Sagrada Família project when he was just 31 years old and he spent the last 12 years of his life completely devoted to his great vocation: serving God through architecture.

Antoni Gaudí, one of the most universal figures of Catalan culture and international architecture, devoted more than 40 years to the Temple of the Sagrada Família.

Apart from the Sagrada Família, the most important project of his life, Antoni Gaudí left behind many other one-of-a-kind works, including Park Güell, Casa Vicens and Casa Batlló, the crypt at Colònia Güell (Santa Coloma de Cervelló) and the Episcopal Palace of Astorga and Casa Botines (Castile and León), among others.

Gaudí took over the Sagrada Família project when he was just 31 years old and he spent the last 12 years of his life completely devoted to his great vocation: serving God through architecture.

The work

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Photo gallery

Photo gallery

Photo gallery

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World Heritage

After his tragic death in June 1926, Gaudí's memory became diluted over the years, and he was not celebrated until well into the 1950s, when he began to attract attention at home and abroad. In 1969, seventeen of his works were declared Artistic/Historical Monuments of Cultural Interest by the Spanish Ministry of Culture. In 1984, Palau Güell, Casa Milà (La Pedrera) and Park Güell were declared UNESCO World Heritage sites. In 2005, Casa Vicens and Casa Batlló, in Barcelona, and the crypt at Colònia Güell, in Santa Coloma de Cervelló, were added to the list. That same year, the Nativity façade and the crypt of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família were declared World Heritage sites. All of these elements are grouped together in the UNESCO listing called "Works of Antoni Gaudí".

On 7 November 2010, Pope Benedict XVI consecrated the Temple and granted it the status of a Minor Basilica.

After his tragic death in June 1926, Gaudí's memory became diluted over the years. It wasn't until 1969 that 17 of his works were declared Artistic/Historical Monuments of Cultural Interest by the Spanish Ministry of Culture. In 1984, Palau Güell, Casa Milà (La Pedrera) and Park Güell were declared UNESCO World Heritage sites. In 2005, Casa Vicens and Casa Batlló, in Barcelona, and the crypt at Colònia Güell, in Santa Coloma de Cervelló, were added to the list. That same year, the Nativity façade and the crypt of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família were declared World Heritage sites. All of these elements are grouped together in the UNESCO listing called "Works of Antoni Gaudí".

On 7 November 2010, Pope Benedict XVI consecrated the Temple and granted it the status of a Minor Basilica.

World Heritage

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Recognition

  • Criteria for recognition

    The criteria that govern the joint UNESCO World Heritage listing of these "Works of Antoni Gaudí", including the crypt and the Nativity façade of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família, are as follows:

    • Criterion (i): The work of Antoni Gaudí represents an exceptional and outstanding creative contribution to the development of architecture and building technology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    • Criterion (ii): Gaudí's work exhibits an important interchange of values closely associated with the cultural and artistic currents of his time, as represented in Modernisme of Catalonia. It anticipated and influenced many of the forms and techniques that were relevant to the development of modern construction in the 20th century.

    • Criterion (iv): Gaudí's work represents a series of outstanding examples of the building typology in the architecture of the early 20th century, residential as well as public, to the development of which he made a significant and creative contribution.

    The criteria that govern the joint UNESCO World Heritage listing of these "Works of Antoni Gaudí", including the crypt and the Nativity façade of the Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Família, are as follows:

    • Criterion (i): The work of Antoni Gaudí represents an exceptional and outstanding creative contribution to the development of architecture and building technology in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    • Criterion (ii): Gaudí's work exhibits an important interchange of values closely associated with the cultural and artistic currents of his time, as represented in Modernisme of Catalonia. It anticipated and influenced many of the forms and techniques that were relevant to the development of modern construction in the 20th century.

    • Criterion (iv): Gaudí's work represents a series of outstanding examples of the building typology in the architecture of the early 20th century, residential as well as public, to the development of which he made a significant and creative contribution.

    Criteria for recognition
  • What does this recognition entail?

    UNESCO's World Heritage list aims to ensure cultural sites around the world, chosen for their outstanding and universal value, are identified and protected from damage or total or partial destruction.

    Being listed entails inventorying elements and a commitment to conservation and dissemination of the works, as their loss would impoverish the heritage of all of humanity.

    UNESCO's World Heritage list aims to ensure cultural sites around the world, chosen for their outstanding and universal value, are identified and protected from damage or total or partial destruction.

    Being listed entails inventorying elements and a commitment to conservation and dissemination of the works, as their loss would impoverish the heritage of all of humanity.

    What does this recognition entail?